check out my sick elephant!

I’m loving the sick elephant series on right now over at Wondermark.

I started reposting them all here for myself, but the best thing you can do is go to the first in the series and click through them on his site, so he gets good feels from knowing people are reading them. And so you’ll never know if you’re reading an elephant comic until you know you’re reading an elephant comic. 

Don’t deprive yourself — go read them

The second best thing you can do is read them all here if you’re too lazy to click through.

Update: I’ve posted up to number 13, but Wondermark is up to number 19 20 on the elephant train! Check out the sick elephant over there — I’m not going to keep reposting them.

Putting the No in Nose

Truly, perhaps all animals are elephants with leprosies of various severity

In which an Elephant is sick

Still undetermined: the type of pachyderm the leprous beast actually is. This is a new frontier for animal science

In which the Sickness descends

And honestly, I feel great!

A Memory Set in Stone

Whenever you buy a tombstone they give you a little wagon to pull it around in. That’s standard

In which a Case is cracked

Tusks are made of chitin, obviously.

In which a Professional is found

An easy enough mistake to make — the practice noodlenosers back in veteronorfian school are all wooden models from the 30s.

Bones of Stone, Heart of Gold

THE HEIST OF THE EPOCH!!!

Bones of Stone, For the Bold

fortunately there are lots of handy how-to techniques for this process on SkelShare.com

In which the Staff is short

It is definitely a literal bone thing. That doesn’t rule out it ALSO being a sex thing, but it is definitely, foremost, a bone thing.

The Cossack Gone Astray

Turns out you can weave a LOT of Chekhov short story titles into 17 short lines of dialogue

In which the Stacks hold Facts

‘The Scarlet Herring’ seemed like it was gonna be pretty good, but then it never really went anywhere.

In which a Tract is hacked

That tract was originally about a kid who valued his special trousers over the love of his family. You know, real relatable content

Thick Skin, White Soap

I think I saw an article in ELLE just recently about the phenomenon

Galaxy S7 & Edge thoughts

After trying-before-I-buy with both models side by side in two different Best Buys, some thoughts:

  • Edge has a wider/better viewing angle — the S7 gets much darker than the Edge when the screen is not exactly straight on. Also much darker than my current iPhone 5.
  • At first store, the Edge gave whites a yellowed tone compared to the S7. At second store, Edge had a pinkish tone on whites compared to S7. Both had same settings, and tested on all screen profiles. 
  • Even straight on, and with the S7 showing better whites, there was a dullness I the S7 that could be annoying over long term use. 
  • The main value I see in the novelty of the edge menu is in taking quick actions on open articles, which will actually be immensely useful for taking notes when reading, or sharing articles. Any other use as a launcher is probably beat by the ease of keeping those apps on the home screen. 

I am really interested in why I’m seeing colour differences between these two models. I’m leaning toward buying the S7, largely due to the wider viewing angle, and the slight ease of use I think the edge will give me in my phone-based activity (reading). But I’m a little uncomfortable with the colour (quality?) inconsistency I’m seeing in the Edge screens.

The closest I’ve come to finding a review that goes beyond comparing just the published specs of the screens (resolution and ppi) and actually looking at the quality of the displays is at DisplayMate, but even though they pride themselves on measuring the color accuracy of the screens, they still only measure the S7’s colors and assume the two screens will be the same.  The two screens are different sizes and are made of different components, so I don’t know why nobody is looking at the non-PR-kit differences between them.

this post will be taken entirely out of context.

Something felt a little bit off in one particular line of “Critical Praise / Review” for Rob Bell (and ostensibly, his new book How to Be Here):

Bell will be joined by the likes of Brian McLaren, James Martin, Diana Butler Bass and Carol Howard Merritt.

— Christianity Today

I could see it working if Bell “joins the likes of…”, but there’s something about how it was written that sounded like a high-schooler’s essay pieced together with sentence fragments taken from all over the internet.

Not far off, that line is actually taken from a Christianity Today article about a podcast/YouTube channel that Rob Bell is involved with — where he is “joined by the likes of Brian McLaren, James Martin, Diana Butler Bass and Carol Howard Merritt.” (It’s so important the article states it twice.)

Now, I know pull-quotes are used out of context all the time, but at least they’re usually coherent. 😛

And then I then read the first pull-quote from Publisher’s Weekly….which sounded familiar because it was already used wholesale as part of the publisher’s product description.

I’m going back to my cave now — the internet is making my head hurt.

PDF problems

I don’t like that I now have to think twice before printing PDFs — I find more and more they’re not actually designed to be printed — just viewed.

The reason: all the background colour. White text on a dark background looks nice on a produced brochure or report, or on a website, but not when I’m printing it at home to read in detail. It just hurts to think of all that ink being wasted — even if I print in grayscale.

Here’s a possible guideline: don’t design a PDF page that will be so wet with ink that it will warp as it comes off a consumer printer.